BRAVO! Graduates of 2017 Using 3D Printing in Surprising Ways

2017-07-19

Aya Bentur  

Dani Clode - RCA - Created a Wearable Third Thumb

Every year in the summer design school graduates around the world present their graduation projects. It’s an exciting time for the graduating students but also for everyone in the design world, looking to see what’s new, innovative, almost like a crystal ball into the future. I had the pleasure to see some of these projects in real life and share the familiar rush of graduation. What struck me most this year is the seamless integration of 3D printing in the projects. In the last couple of years, we noticed that 3D printing wasn’t treated anymore as a novelty or a fast way to produce a prototype but rather, when chosen, the technology was used for its merits and characteristics, just like choosing casting or laser cutting. Here is the first batch of 2 (second coming soon): 7 graduates’ smart and surprising uses of 3D printing, giving us a glimpse into what these designers (and others) might come up with next.

Super Thumb

Dani Clode, an RCA (Royal College of Art) product design masters graduate, created a Wearable Third Thumb. The device serves as an extension of the human body, not as a replacement digit but rather as a tool meant to increase natural ability and the range of actions we can do with our hands. The Third Thumb is 3D printed with Ninjaflex, a flexible filament, and a cover 3D printed in a resin which is more rigid, holding it in place. The device is attached to 2 motors, creating a range of movement, and operated with pressure sensors located on the wearer’s shoes. Clode received the Helen Hamlyn Design Award for Creativity, dedicated to inclusive design solutions, for this design.

Dani Clode - RCA - Created a Wearable Third Thumb - Movement

Sharing an Experience

Katia Rabey a graduate of the department of Jewelry Design at Shenkar wrote a bedtime story and created the characters that go along with it. The story named Journey to Jibbiard allows adult and child to share an experience of fantasy and wonderment. The creatures in the story take shape as jewelry which can be worn by child and parent in various states, combining 3D printed colorful shapes and delicate silver work.

Katia Rabey - Journey to Jibbiard - Jewelry as a Shared Experience by Children and Adults - Necklace Combining 3D Printing

Katia Rabey - Journey to Jibbiard - Jewelry as a Shared Experience by Children and Adults - Necklace - Open - Combining 3D Printing

Katia Rabey - Journey to Jibbiard - Jewelry as a Shared Experience by Children and Adults - Earrings Combining 3D Printing

Feel the Interface

TAC TILES is a physical interface for 3D modeling and 3D printing, intended to create a more intuitive and simple user experience. The tiles are modular, can be reconfigured and customized to each user’s individual preferences. The interface, which is also partially 3D printed was designed by Simon Van Pottelbergh from LUCA School of Arts -Belgium.
Close Up of TAC TILES - Designed by Simon Van Pottelbergh - a Physical Interface for 3D Modelling and 3D Printing - LUCA School of Arts -Belgium

TAC TILES - Designed by Simon Van Pottelbergh - a Physical Interface for 3D Modelling and 3D Printing - LUCA School of Arts -Belgium

Control Over Material

Zohar Fadlon of the Department of Jewelry and Fashion at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design dedicated the last year to exploring and intervening in the process of 3D printing. Her project pushes against the limitations that occur in the process of outsourcing 3D printing, from size to material and its characteristics. The result is an entirely 3D printed bag collection named ZAX, utilizing her experimental process to achieve flexibility, rigidity, delicate and strong surfaces for various functions of the bags.

Zohar Fadlon - Created ZAX a 3D Printed Bag Collection - Jewelry Department Bezalel

 

Zohar Fadlon - Created ZAX a 3D Printed Bag Collection - Jewelry Department Bezalel - All

3D Printed Memories

Another graduate of the Department of Jewelry and Fashion at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design is Alina Gochaev who designed From Pieces to Whole, a jewelry collection incorporating 3D printing and silver. Her work draws inspiration from the family photo album, examining the layers of memories, she uses motifs from the photos such as carpets, windows, and oval frames, reconstructing them as 3D printed images. The 3D printed elements, framed by silver create a nostalgic but new perception of past memories.

Alina Gochaev - From Pieces to Whole - Jewelry Collection Incorporating 3D Printing and Silver - Jewelry Department Bezalel - 1

 

Alina Gochaev - From Pieces to Whole - Jewelry Collection Incorporating 3D Printing and Silver - Jewelry Department Bezalel - 2

The Symbiotics of Nature and Technology

Yarden Mor‘s studies combined two very different programs: Computer Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Industrial design at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Combining these two fields led to her graduation project Symbio. In her project, Mor uses 3D printing and parametric design in order to create symbiotic urban design solutions. She aims to create solutions where human-use and nature can be integrated while preserving nature and maintaining the comfort we are used to. The process includes 3D scanning of the trees, parametric design, and 3D printing. The synthetic material is designed around the organic, creating a 3D printed structure that allows the tree to continue to grow and change within the additional structure, even strengthening it as it grows.

Yarden Mor - Symbio - Using 3D Printing and Parametric Design for Symbiotic Urban Design Solutions - Graduate of  HUJI and  Bezalel

Redefining Preciousness

The use of 3D printing as an integral part of jewelry pieces, not as models or lost wax, is a true testament to the material and aesthetics characteristics of the technology and materials. Department of Jewelry Design at Shenkar graduate Eden Mindal created Redefinition, a jewelry collection contemplating materials and applications of near future jewelry. The jewelry combined with silver utilizes 3D printed polymers as precious stone-like material, created a surprising yet familiar effect.

Mindal Eden - Redefinition - 3D Printed Precious Stone-Like Material Combined with Silver - Jewelry Department Shenkar

We’d love to hear your thoughts and impressions from graduation season. If you have a project you’d like to share email us or share your comments and suggestions below. For more inspiration and information follow us on Pinterest or subscribe to our newsletter for weekly updates.

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