Caps in the Air: Graduates Presenting 3D Printed Design Projects

2016-07-20

Aya Bentur  

Panta Rhei Designed by Hila Mor - 3D Printed Ceramics with Inner Structure for Water

For graduation season we have collected 3D printed design projects, ranging from fashion to architecture, from art to customized manufacturing. This week we will focus on lighting, bio-mimetic structures, and customized products. Next week – fashion, accessories, and more industrial design.

A Bright Light Future

Shira Kimmel from the Industrial Design department at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design created a platform for modular lighting. The project, aptly named Lumen Tree (below) re-examines the relationship between technology, the designer, and the user, by enabling a freedom of creativity and self-expression. The 3D printed modular elements offer a range of variations allowing the user to create unlimited structures, each element can be adapted in shape, size, texture and color and 3D printed locally. The light bulbs are easily snapped into the 3D printed elements, making the bulbs the connectors between the ‘branches’. Lumen Tree intends to place the user as a central player in the process of design, production and assembly.

Shira Kimmel - Lumen Tree - 3D Printed Modular Lights

Chen ZhiHe from Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing combined traditional Chinese ink painting with contemporary 3D printing technologies. Her graduation project, Ink Cloud (below), was inspired by the artistic history of ink painting, the shape  based on the movement and form ink takes when it drops into water. The Lamp is 3D printed in a transparent photosensitive resin and painted in black, giving it a semi-transparent luminescent effect when light shines through it.

Chen ZhiHe - Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing -3D Printed Ink Cloud - LIght

Chen ZhiHe - Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing -3D Printed Ink Cloud - Detail

Biomimicry to a Degree

Detail - Enlightenment Designed by Limor Kabarity - 3D Printed Wax - Cast in Silver and Plique-a-Jour

Enlightenment (below and detail above) by Limor Kabarity, recent Jewelry and Fashion department graduate at Bezalel, shows an intricate use of 3D printing combined with traditional Plique-a-jour technique. Kabarity built the structure of the skull, zooming in on the bone structure itself, with the help of parametric code and 3D design programs. The web-like structure was 3D printed in wax and cast, served as the basis for the traditional Plique-a-jour technique, combining the two extremes of technology. More about casting using 3D printing here.

Enlightenment Designed by Limor Kabarity - 3D Printed Wax - Cast in Silver and Plique-a-Jour

Panta Rhei, literally meaning ‘everything flows’ explores the movement of water in and through material. Ceramic material has the ability to conduct water, this interaction allows filtering, cooling, changing color etc. Hila Mor, graduate of the Industrial Design department at Bezalel, utilized the abilities of 3D printing to control the inner structure of the porcelain, allowing her to guide the water within the vessel. The visual results are controlled yet surprising, leading to different uses: conducting water to grow seeds, filtering drinking water, or serving as a cooling element (below).

Panta Rhei Series Designed by Hila Mor - 3D Printed Ceramics with Inner Structure for Water Panta Rhei Series Designed by Hila Mor - 3D Printed Ceramics with Inner Structure for Water

Architecture graduate at the University of Westminster, Tia Kharrat designed an architectural structure based on the geometry of eggs of a rare butterfly species. Kharrat designed Metamorphosis: Inception, a structure composed of perforated 3D printed panels. The concave shape of the panels allows light to enter and spread through the structure creating a habitat suitable for butterflies. More about biometric research in architecture and design in our previous post.

Tia Kharrat - a 3D Printed Structure Biomimicking the Butterfly Egg

Graduate to Custom Fab

Fab Forms (below and in video) is a series of self-produced products made with 3D printing and CNC. Ori Porat from HIT designed products involving the user in their creation; the files are accessible online, allowing the user to choose from the offered variations and adjust the specifications. The user is the manufacturer, controlling the assembly process, the details of the 3D printed elements, the color, and the finish of the wood.

Detail - Fab Forms Designed by Ori Porat - Self Produced Products Using 3D Printing

 

Alexander Geht addresses the possibilities in the new industrial revolution, especially in products for special needs. The needs of the disabled are very specific and usually, are not mass produced as the market is very small, this results in products which answer general needs and cannot be personalized. Moreover, these products usually stay in their ‘engineering phase’ answering only technical needs, relating to the user as a patient and not an individual. Geht utilizes today’s technological advancements especially 3D printing in creating a set of tools designed for activation with jaw muscles.

Alexander Geht Designed Colibri - 3D Printed Tools for Special Needs - Gardening

His graduation project at the Industrial Design department at BezalelColibri, is a modular platform creating a set of tools activated by bite for individuals which are paralyzed from the neck down (above). The tools are composed of 2 parts, a kit transforming the bite to a mechanical movement 3D printed in SLS, and open source parts, that can be printed on any home printer, creating various end tools (below). The uses suggested in this project allow playing table games or gardening, they may not answer necessary daily needs but trigger imagining a wider range of actions. More about Colibri in this video.

Alexander Geht Designed Colibri - 3D Printed Tools for Special Needs

There are so many more interesting projects to talk about, next week – more 3D printed fashion, accessories and industrial design from design schools around the world. Until then, tell us about recent graduation projects, here in the comments, on Twitter or Facebook. Congratulations and success to the new designers!

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